Photo ops and media availabilities don’t make a plan

Last month Christy Clark was the “Family Premier”TM.  Now, she’s the “Jobs Premier”.

The key to Clark’s transition: lousy poll results that killed the never-to-be fall election.  Voters had determined that Clark was policy light version of Campbell, just another BC Liberal politician who lived and ruled to shuffle tax-payers money off to her friends and political funders.  And they had determined that and she were well past due date – over 7 points back of the NDP.

How can the average person who doesn’t have a poll at their fingertips know this?  Think about it.  If  Christy Clark wanted to be the “Jobs Premier” she would have started ten months ago when BC’s economy started going south and unemployment began to grow and nobody was doing anything about it.

If she cared about anything to do with the people she hoped to govern when Clark decide to run she would have noticed that under the Campbell Liberal government BC was hemorrhaging jobs.

BC lost 52 thousand jobs over those months – one of the worst records in Canada.  Worse, BC lost 68 thousand full time jobs.  BC is now the only western province with an unemployment rate higher than the national average.

This is the record of a government fiddling around with a failed tax policy while Rome burned.

And Clark did nothing for eight months.  That’s not a Job Premier.  It’s a “who cares about jobs, the family or anything else not involving a camera and an exclusive with Keith” Premier.

So should we be surprised that her jobs tour is more of the same – a series of minor announcements with no policy, no targets and no real money but lots of duplication, old programs and photo ops.

Justine Hunter says Clark’s “plan” offers no grist for the NDP – a cynical political take on an issue that harms over 200,000 British Columbians and their families.

But that’s because Clark’s plan offers no grist for anyone.  It’s just the foul wind of a government that isn’t only out of ideas, it doesn’t know how to think new ideas.

No wonder Clark offers so few real targets, settling for time frames of ten years and more from now.   Is the Premier blind?  BC’s unemployment rate is expected to grow significantly in the next year.  Some progress ten years from now isn’t what unemployed British Columbians are looking for.

When Clark was education minister she insisted on the value of regular evaluation and assessment for all kids.

How can you “ensure competency without testing” she pushed back at the NDP critic in 2003.  Well, exactly.

Without targets and assessment how can you ensure competency?  How can the Premier be judged on her plan?  Should the number of photo ops and media availabilities be a part of the test?

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2 Responses to Photo ops and media availabilities don’t make a plan

  1. Canadian Canary says:

    Excellent observation and points re the presto-change-o of of Clark’s sudden re-branding.

    And thanks for revealing Justine Hunter’s failings:
    “Justine Hunter says Clark’s “plan” offers no grist for the NDP – a cynical political take on an issue that harms over 200,000 British Columbians and their families.”

    I’ve always found Hunter to be short of journalistic integrity, skating just above the level where you can roundly criticize her for bias. You nailed my discomfort with her reporting perfectly — “cynical political take”.

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